New research finds that eating onions may help you lose weight and prevent diabetes

A new study suggests eating more than one onion a day could help people with diabetes control their weight and improve their insulin sensitivity, as well as reduce the risk of heart disease.

The study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that people who ate at least three portions of onions a day, or at least two onions a week, had a 30 per cent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who ate just one onion.

It also found that those who had more than 10 servings a day had a 50 per cent reduced risk of diabetes compared to those who only ate one serving.

Researchers also found people who drank at least six cups of coffee a day also had a 33 per cent higher risk of type 2 diabetus than those that drank less than three cups a day.

The new study also found eating at least 10 portions of green leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, broccoli and carrots, each day reduced the risk by 35 per cent compared to consuming just one portion.

“People who eat at least five portions of vegetables a day can help them reduce their intake of carbohydrates and cholesterol, as the vegetables contain essential nutrients that may help reduce their risk of Type 2 diabetes,” Dr Peter Hutt, a research fellow at the University of Cambridge’s Centre for Nutritional Research, said.

“They also lower their blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels, which may help in preventing heart disease, and help them control their blood sugar levels.”

It is important to remember that many of these benefits come with a cost – not only in terms of weight loss but also in terms to diabetes.

“People who ate one onion daily also reduced their risk by about three per cent on average, compared to eating no more than two onions, the researchers said.

It is not known exactly how many grams of carbohydrates the onions contain.

The researchers did not look at how much fat or calories the onions contained, and so did not measure whether they had a high glycemic index.”

Our results suggest that people may need more than five portions per day of vegetables and more than six servings per day to achieve the same weight loss,” Dr Hutt said.

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